HR Process

How to Successfully Schedule Check-Ins Meetings with New Employees

Mar 16, 2024

How to Identify Gaps in New Employee Integration with the Company? How to Ensure Smooth Operations and Minimize Effort and Costs for Hiring New Employees? Check-Ins meetings are a way to identify these issues early on. In this article, Hireforce will provide all the useful information surrounding this issue so that you can improve your company's onboarding process.

What is the purpose of these Check-Ins meetings?

The purpose of Check-Ins meetings is to establish a solid foundation for the success of new employees, such as:

  • Sharing information and feedback

  • Addressing any questions and difficulties

  • Setting performance goals and learning objectives

  • Building a strong relationship between the supervisor and the new employee.

How should Check-Ins meetings be conducted?

Check-Ins meetings should be conducted as two-way conversations. It's important to create a focused and non-distracting space for these meetings.

How to Conduct Check-Ins Effectively?

To ensure that Check-Ins are effective and beneficial for both new employees and the organization, consider the following principles:

  1. Prepare in advance: Before each Check-In, managers should review the progress, performance of the new employee, and any notes from previous Check-Ins.

  2. Create a positive environment: Start each Check-In with warm and friendly greetings. Acknowledge the efforts of the new employee, reinforce positives for achievements, and express genuine interest in their experiences and challenges.

  3. Ask open-ended questions: Encourage the new employee to share their thoughts, concerns, and experiences by asking open-ended questions. This promotes positive interaction and a deeper understanding of their perspective.

For example: Instead of asking, "Are you facing any challenges?" which may lead to simple "yes" or "no" answers, ask, "What challenges have you encountered so far, and how can I support you in overcoming them?" This encourages the new employee to provide detailed insights and opens up avenues for problem-solving.

  1. Actively listen: During Check-Ins, actively listen to the feedback, concerns, and responses of the new employee. Practice empathy and show genuine interest in their perspective. This helps build trust, strengthen working relationships, and foster a supportive environment.

  2. Provide constructive feedback: Offer specific and actionable feedback to the new employee based on their performance and progress. Highlight strengths, acknowledge efforts, and provide guidance on areas for improvement. Ensure that feedback is constructive and supportive, emphasizing growth and development.

For example: Instead of saying, "Your communication skills need improvement," provide specific feedback like, "Your written communication skills are excellent, and I appreciate your attention to detail. To further enhance verbal communication, I suggest practicing active listening and summarizing key points."

  1. Set realistic goals: Collaborate with the new employee to set realistic short-term and long-term goals. These goals should align with their role, career aspirations, and organizational objectives. Regularly review these goals to track progress and make any necessary adjustments.

  2. Address concerns and challenges: Actively address any concerns or challenges raised by the new employee during Check-Ins. Listen empathetically, offer support, and collaborate to find solutions. This demonstrates that their concerns are valued, and the organization is committed to their success.

  3. Document action points: Take notes during Check-Ins and summarize key discussion points, action items, and goals. Share these notes with the new employee to ensure clarity and provide a reference for future Check-Ins.

For example: After each Check-In, send a summary email outlining the main discussion points, agreed-upon action items, and any additional resources or support provided. This ensures clarity and serves as a record for both the new employee and the manager.

  1. Follow up: After each Check-In, it's essential to follow up on the discussed action items. Monitor the progress of the new employee, provide additional support as needed, and acknowledge achievements. This demonstrates ongoing commitment and fosters accountability.

  2. Continuous improvement: Regularly evaluate the effectiveness of the Check-In process and seek feedback from the new employee. Assess whether any adjustments or improvements are needed to enhance the overall onboarding experience and implement necessary changes accordingly.

When scheduling these Check-Ins meetings, supervisors should prioritize the following

  1. Timeliness: Schedule Check-Ins meetings before the new employee's start date or immediately upon their arrival. This demonstrates the importance of the onboarding process and creates a positive experience for them.

  2. Consistency: Schedule regular Check-Ins at consistent intervals, such as 30, 60, 90 days, 6 months, and 1 year. Consistency ensures that your company provides continuous interaction and support throughout the onboarding process.

  3. Importance: Prioritize Check-Ins meetings as a top priority. Consider them as crucial conversations that require dedicated time and attention. Avoid canceling or rescheduling unless absolutely necessary, and if rescheduling is needed, prioritize setting a new date immediately.

The focus should be on

  1. Creating a dedicated and distraction-free space for Check-Ins meetings. Minimize interruptions and distractions to ensure that both the supervisor and the new employee can focus on the conversation.

  2. Flexibility: While meetings can be conducted via Zoom or Teams, consider opting for face-to-face meetings, especially for meetings lasting 6 months to 1 year. In-person meetings can enhance connections with remote workers and help build stronger relationships.

  3. Personalization: Customize Check-Ins meetings to fit the needs and circumstances of the new employee. Consider the complexity of their job tasks and work relationships when planning Check-Ins meetings.

By prioritizing these aspects, supervisors can ensure that Check-Ins meetings are conducted efficiently, meaningfully, and supportive for new employees throughout the onboarding process.

Topics to be addressed in each meeting

30 Day Check-In Meeting:

  • Ask the new employee about their first 30 days of work.

  • Provide feedback on their progress in specific areas, citing evidence.

  • Discuss their use of Zoom, Teams, and email, ensuring regular communication and information sharing.

  • Inquire about what is working well and why, while also asking about areas of success.

  • Discuss areas that still need attention or improvement and request ideas to support improvement.

  • Share feedback on specific areas that could be improved, providing evidence and clarifying expectations.

  • Assess relationships with team members and mentors.

  • Address any questions regarding departmental structure, expectations, or benefits.

60 Day Check-In Meeting:

  • Ask about the employee's past 30 days.

  • Provide feedback on their progress in specific areas, citing evidence.

  • Discuss their continued use of Zoom, Teams, and email, addressing any remaining questions in the functional training.

  • Discuss what continues to work well and why, while also asking about ongoing areas of success.

  • Discuss areas that still require attention or improvement and ask for ideas to support improvement.

  • Share feedback on specific areas that could be improved, providing evidence and clarifying expectations.

  • Assess relationships with team members and mentors.

  • Address any questions about departmental structure or internal working relationships.

90 Day Check-In Meeting:

  • Ask the new employee about their past 30 days.

  • Provide feedback on their progress in specific areas, citing evidence.

  • Discuss their use of Zoom, Teams, and email, addressing any remaining questions from functional training.

  • Inquire about how to provide the best feedback for them.

  • Discuss areas that may still require attention or improvement and request ideas to support improvement.

  • Share feedback on specific areas that could be improved, providing evidence and clarifying expectations.

  • Assess relationships with team members and mentors.

  • Address any questions about departmental structure or internal working relationships.

6-Month Probationary Review:

This meeting is more formal and follows a different process. It's a necessary meeting to evaluate the employee's job effectiveness. The supervisor completes a Performance Evaluation Form provided by the HR department. The meeting should still include discussions about the employee's progress, reliable areas, feedback, and support for improvement.

One-Year Work Anniversary Meeting:

This meeting is a celebration of the employee's one-year work anniversary. Discussions should include the employee's progress, areas of success, feedback, and support for improvement. Express gratitude for their contribution to the organization.

Where should Check-Ins take place?

Check-Ins can be conducted through various means based on the structure and preference of the organization. Some common options include:

In-person meetings: Face-to-face meetings allow for 1:1 interaction, non-verbal cues, and a more personal connection. They are particularly valuable for initial Check-Ins and building a solid foundation. Video calls: In cases where the new employee is remote or located elsewhere, video conferencing platforms provide an effective means to conduct Check-Ins while still maintaining visual interaction. Phone calls: When face-to-face interaction isn't possible, phone calls provide a convenient alternative for Check-Ins, allowing for direct conversation and real-time feedback. Communication via email or chat: In certain circumstances, Check-Ins may occur through text-based communication channels. While not as personal as face-to-face meetings, these methods can still facilitate convenient feedback and support.

The choice of communication medium should be based on the nature of the discussion, the level of necessity, and the preferences of both the new employee and the manager.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What if the new employee doesn't have any specific questions during the Check-Ins? It's not uncommon for new employees to have periods where they don't have any particular concerns or specific questions. In these cases, the Check-Ins can focus on reviewing their overall progress, acknowledging their achievements, and discussing any upcoming projects or goals. Check-Ins can also be an opportunity to provide updates about the organization, upcoming events, or training opportunities that may be relevant to the new employee.

How long do Check-Ins meetings typically last?

The timing of Check-Ins can vary depending on the complexity of the discussion and the needs of the new employee. On average, Check-In sessions can range from 30 minutes to an hour. However, what's important is prioritizing quality over quantity. It's crucial to focus on meaningful support, addressing concerns, and promoting open communication, rather than rigidly adhering to a specific time limit.

Summary

Check-Ins play a crucial role in providing support, guidance, and feedback to new employees. By scheduling Check-Ins at appropriate intervals, organizations can create a positive onboarding experience; adjust expectations; identify and address challenges; while also facilitating conditions for the growth and development of new employees. Remember that effective Check-Ins require active listening, constructive feedback, goal-setting, and continuous improvement. By doing so, organizations can prepare their new employees for success and nurture a culture of continuous support and development.

HR Process

How to Successfully Schedule Check-Ins Meetings with New Employees

Mar 16, 2024

How to Identify Gaps in New Employee Integration with the Company? How to Ensure Smooth Operations and Minimize Effort and Costs for Hiring New Employees? Check-Ins meetings are a way to identify these issues early on. In this article, Hireforce will provide all the useful information surrounding this issue so that you can improve your company's onboarding process.

What is the purpose of these Check-Ins meetings?

The purpose of Check-Ins meetings is to establish a solid foundation for the success of new employees, such as:

  • Sharing information and feedback

  • Addressing any questions and difficulties

  • Setting performance goals and learning objectives

  • Building a strong relationship between the supervisor and the new employee.

How should Check-Ins meetings be conducted?

Check-Ins meetings should be conducted as two-way conversations. It's important to create a focused and non-distracting space for these meetings.

How to Conduct Check-Ins Effectively?

To ensure that Check-Ins are effective and beneficial for both new employees and the organization, consider the following principles:

  1. Prepare in advance: Before each Check-In, managers should review the progress, performance of the new employee, and any notes from previous Check-Ins.

  2. Create a positive environment: Start each Check-In with warm and friendly greetings. Acknowledge the efforts of the new employee, reinforce positives for achievements, and express genuine interest in their experiences and challenges.

  3. Ask open-ended questions: Encourage the new employee to share their thoughts, concerns, and experiences by asking open-ended questions. This promotes positive interaction and a deeper understanding of their perspective.

For example: Instead of asking, "Are you facing any challenges?" which may lead to simple "yes" or "no" answers, ask, "What challenges have you encountered so far, and how can I support you in overcoming them?" This encourages the new employee to provide detailed insights and opens up avenues for problem-solving.

  1. Actively listen: During Check-Ins, actively listen to the feedback, concerns, and responses of the new employee. Practice empathy and show genuine interest in their perspective. This helps build trust, strengthen working relationships, and foster a supportive environment.

  2. Provide constructive feedback: Offer specific and actionable feedback to the new employee based on their performance and progress. Highlight strengths, acknowledge efforts, and provide guidance on areas for improvement. Ensure that feedback is constructive and supportive, emphasizing growth and development.

For example: Instead of saying, "Your communication skills need improvement," provide specific feedback like, "Your written communication skills are excellent, and I appreciate your attention to detail. To further enhance verbal communication, I suggest practicing active listening and summarizing key points."

  1. Set realistic goals: Collaborate with the new employee to set realistic short-term and long-term goals. These goals should align with their role, career aspirations, and organizational objectives. Regularly review these goals to track progress and make any necessary adjustments.

  2. Address concerns and challenges: Actively address any concerns or challenges raised by the new employee during Check-Ins. Listen empathetically, offer support, and collaborate to find solutions. This demonstrates that their concerns are valued, and the organization is committed to their success.

  3. Document action points: Take notes during Check-Ins and summarize key discussion points, action items, and goals. Share these notes with the new employee to ensure clarity and provide a reference for future Check-Ins.

For example: After each Check-In, send a summary email outlining the main discussion points, agreed-upon action items, and any additional resources or support provided. This ensures clarity and serves as a record for both the new employee and the manager.

  1. Follow up: After each Check-In, it's essential to follow up on the discussed action items. Monitor the progress of the new employee, provide additional support as needed, and acknowledge achievements. This demonstrates ongoing commitment and fosters accountability.

  2. Continuous improvement: Regularly evaluate the effectiveness of the Check-In process and seek feedback from the new employee. Assess whether any adjustments or improvements are needed to enhance the overall onboarding experience and implement necessary changes accordingly.

When scheduling these Check-Ins meetings, supervisors should prioritize the following

  1. Timeliness: Schedule Check-Ins meetings before the new employee's start date or immediately upon their arrival. This demonstrates the importance of the onboarding process and creates a positive experience for them.

  2. Consistency: Schedule regular Check-Ins at consistent intervals, such as 30, 60, 90 days, 6 months, and 1 year. Consistency ensures that your company provides continuous interaction and support throughout the onboarding process.

  3. Importance: Prioritize Check-Ins meetings as a top priority. Consider them as crucial conversations that require dedicated time and attention. Avoid canceling or rescheduling unless absolutely necessary, and if rescheduling is needed, prioritize setting a new date immediately.

The focus should be on

  1. Creating a dedicated and distraction-free space for Check-Ins meetings. Minimize interruptions and distractions to ensure that both the supervisor and the new employee can focus on the conversation.

  2. Flexibility: While meetings can be conducted via Zoom or Teams, consider opting for face-to-face meetings, especially for meetings lasting 6 months to 1 year. In-person meetings can enhance connections with remote workers and help build stronger relationships.

  3. Personalization: Customize Check-Ins meetings to fit the needs and circumstances of the new employee. Consider the complexity of their job tasks and work relationships when planning Check-Ins meetings.

By prioritizing these aspects, supervisors can ensure that Check-Ins meetings are conducted efficiently, meaningfully, and supportive for new employees throughout the onboarding process.

Topics to be addressed in each meeting

30 Day Check-In Meeting:

  • Ask the new employee about their first 30 days of work.

  • Provide feedback on their progress in specific areas, citing evidence.

  • Discuss their use of Zoom, Teams, and email, ensuring regular communication and information sharing.

  • Inquire about what is working well and why, while also asking about areas of success.

  • Discuss areas that still need attention or improvement and request ideas to support improvement.

  • Share feedback on specific areas that could be improved, providing evidence and clarifying expectations.

  • Assess relationships with team members and mentors.

  • Address any questions regarding departmental structure, expectations, or benefits.

60 Day Check-In Meeting:

  • Ask about the employee's past 30 days.

  • Provide feedback on their progress in specific areas, citing evidence.

  • Discuss their continued use of Zoom, Teams, and email, addressing any remaining questions in the functional training.

  • Discuss what continues to work well and why, while also asking about ongoing areas of success.

  • Discuss areas that still require attention or improvement and ask for ideas to support improvement.

  • Share feedback on specific areas that could be improved, providing evidence and clarifying expectations.

  • Assess relationships with team members and mentors.

  • Address any questions about departmental structure or internal working relationships.

90 Day Check-In Meeting:

  • Ask the new employee about their past 30 days.

  • Provide feedback on their progress in specific areas, citing evidence.

  • Discuss their use of Zoom, Teams, and email, addressing any remaining questions from functional training.

  • Inquire about how to provide the best feedback for them.

  • Discuss areas that may still require attention or improvement and request ideas to support improvement.

  • Share feedback on specific areas that could be improved, providing evidence and clarifying expectations.

  • Assess relationships with team members and mentors.

  • Address any questions about departmental structure or internal working relationships.

6-Month Probationary Review:

This meeting is more formal and follows a different process. It's a necessary meeting to evaluate the employee's job effectiveness. The supervisor completes a Performance Evaluation Form provided by the HR department. The meeting should still include discussions about the employee's progress, reliable areas, feedback, and support for improvement.

One-Year Work Anniversary Meeting:

This meeting is a celebration of the employee's one-year work anniversary. Discussions should include the employee's progress, areas of success, feedback, and support for improvement. Express gratitude for their contribution to the organization.

Where should Check-Ins take place?

Check-Ins can be conducted through various means based on the structure and preference of the organization. Some common options include:

In-person meetings: Face-to-face meetings allow for 1:1 interaction, non-verbal cues, and a more personal connection. They are particularly valuable for initial Check-Ins and building a solid foundation. Video calls: In cases where the new employee is remote or located elsewhere, video conferencing platforms provide an effective means to conduct Check-Ins while still maintaining visual interaction. Phone calls: When face-to-face interaction isn't possible, phone calls provide a convenient alternative for Check-Ins, allowing for direct conversation and real-time feedback. Communication via email or chat: In certain circumstances, Check-Ins may occur through text-based communication channels. While not as personal as face-to-face meetings, these methods can still facilitate convenient feedback and support.

The choice of communication medium should be based on the nature of the discussion, the level of necessity, and the preferences of both the new employee and the manager.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What if the new employee doesn't have any specific questions during the Check-Ins? It's not uncommon for new employees to have periods where they don't have any particular concerns or specific questions. In these cases, the Check-Ins can focus on reviewing their overall progress, acknowledging their achievements, and discussing any upcoming projects or goals. Check-Ins can also be an opportunity to provide updates about the organization, upcoming events, or training opportunities that may be relevant to the new employee.

How long do Check-Ins meetings typically last?

The timing of Check-Ins can vary depending on the complexity of the discussion and the needs of the new employee. On average, Check-In sessions can range from 30 minutes to an hour. However, what's important is prioritizing quality over quantity. It's crucial to focus on meaningful support, addressing concerns, and promoting open communication, rather than rigidly adhering to a specific time limit.

Summary

Check-Ins play a crucial role in providing support, guidance, and feedback to new employees. By scheduling Check-Ins at appropriate intervals, organizations can create a positive onboarding experience; adjust expectations; identify and address challenges; while also facilitating conditions for the growth and development of new employees. Remember that effective Check-Ins require active listening, constructive feedback, goal-setting, and continuous improvement. By doing so, organizations can prepare their new employees for success and nurture a culture of continuous support and development.

HR Process

How to Successfully Schedule Check-Ins Meetings with New Employees

Mar 16, 2024

How to Identify Gaps in New Employee Integration with the Company? How to Ensure Smooth Operations and Minimize Effort and Costs for Hiring New Employees? Check-Ins meetings are a way to identify these issues early on. In this article, Hireforce will provide all the useful information surrounding this issue so that you can improve your company's onboarding process.

What is the purpose of these Check-Ins meetings?

The purpose of Check-Ins meetings is to establish a solid foundation for the success of new employees, such as:

  • Sharing information and feedback

  • Addressing any questions and difficulties

  • Setting performance goals and learning objectives

  • Building a strong relationship between the supervisor and the new employee.

How should Check-Ins meetings be conducted?

Check-Ins meetings should be conducted as two-way conversations. It's important to create a focused and non-distracting space for these meetings.

How to Conduct Check-Ins Effectively?

To ensure that Check-Ins are effective and beneficial for both new employees and the organization, consider the following principles:

  1. Prepare in advance: Before each Check-In, managers should review the progress, performance of the new employee, and any notes from previous Check-Ins.

  2. Create a positive environment: Start each Check-In with warm and friendly greetings. Acknowledge the efforts of the new employee, reinforce positives for achievements, and express genuine interest in their experiences and challenges.

  3. Ask open-ended questions: Encourage the new employee to share their thoughts, concerns, and experiences by asking open-ended questions. This promotes positive interaction and a deeper understanding of their perspective.

For example: Instead of asking, "Are you facing any challenges?" which may lead to simple "yes" or "no" answers, ask, "What challenges have you encountered so far, and how can I support you in overcoming them?" This encourages the new employee to provide detailed insights and opens up avenues for problem-solving.

  1. Actively listen: During Check-Ins, actively listen to the feedback, concerns, and responses of the new employee. Practice empathy and show genuine interest in their perspective. This helps build trust, strengthen working relationships, and foster a supportive environment.

  2. Provide constructive feedback: Offer specific and actionable feedback to the new employee based on their performance and progress. Highlight strengths, acknowledge efforts, and provide guidance on areas for improvement. Ensure that feedback is constructive and supportive, emphasizing growth and development.

For example: Instead of saying, "Your communication skills need improvement," provide specific feedback like, "Your written communication skills are excellent, and I appreciate your attention to detail. To further enhance verbal communication, I suggest practicing active listening and summarizing key points."

  1. Set realistic goals: Collaborate with the new employee to set realistic short-term and long-term goals. These goals should align with their role, career aspirations, and organizational objectives. Regularly review these goals to track progress and make any necessary adjustments.

  2. Address concerns and challenges: Actively address any concerns or challenges raised by the new employee during Check-Ins. Listen empathetically, offer support, and collaborate to find solutions. This demonstrates that their concerns are valued, and the organization is committed to their success.

  3. Document action points: Take notes during Check-Ins and summarize key discussion points, action items, and goals. Share these notes with the new employee to ensure clarity and provide a reference for future Check-Ins.

For example: After each Check-In, send a summary email outlining the main discussion points, agreed-upon action items, and any additional resources or support provided. This ensures clarity and serves as a record for both the new employee and the manager.

  1. Follow up: After each Check-In, it's essential to follow up on the discussed action items. Monitor the progress of the new employee, provide additional support as needed, and acknowledge achievements. This demonstrates ongoing commitment and fosters accountability.

  2. Continuous improvement: Regularly evaluate the effectiveness of the Check-In process and seek feedback from the new employee. Assess whether any adjustments or improvements are needed to enhance the overall onboarding experience and implement necessary changes accordingly.

When scheduling these Check-Ins meetings, supervisors should prioritize the following

  1. Timeliness: Schedule Check-Ins meetings before the new employee's start date or immediately upon their arrival. This demonstrates the importance of the onboarding process and creates a positive experience for them.

  2. Consistency: Schedule regular Check-Ins at consistent intervals, such as 30, 60, 90 days, 6 months, and 1 year. Consistency ensures that your company provides continuous interaction and support throughout the onboarding process.

  3. Importance: Prioritize Check-Ins meetings as a top priority. Consider them as crucial conversations that require dedicated time and attention. Avoid canceling or rescheduling unless absolutely necessary, and if rescheduling is needed, prioritize setting a new date immediately.

The focus should be on

  1. Creating a dedicated and distraction-free space for Check-Ins meetings. Minimize interruptions and distractions to ensure that both the supervisor and the new employee can focus on the conversation.

  2. Flexibility: While meetings can be conducted via Zoom or Teams, consider opting for face-to-face meetings, especially for meetings lasting 6 months to 1 year. In-person meetings can enhance connections with remote workers and help build stronger relationships.

  3. Personalization: Customize Check-Ins meetings to fit the needs and circumstances of the new employee. Consider the complexity of their job tasks and work relationships when planning Check-Ins meetings.

By prioritizing these aspects, supervisors can ensure that Check-Ins meetings are conducted efficiently, meaningfully, and supportive for new employees throughout the onboarding process.

Topics to be addressed in each meeting

30 Day Check-In Meeting:

  • Ask the new employee about their first 30 days of work.

  • Provide feedback on their progress in specific areas, citing evidence.

  • Discuss their use of Zoom, Teams, and email, ensuring regular communication and information sharing.

  • Inquire about what is working well and why, while also asking about areas of success.

  • Discuss areas that still need attention or improvement and request ideas to support improvement.

  • Share feedback on specific areas that could be improved, providing evidence and clarifying expectations.

  • Assess relationships with team members and mentors.

  • Address any questions regarding departmental structure, expectations, or benefits.

60 Day Check-In Meeting:

  • Ask about the employee's past 30 days.

  • Provide feedback on their progress in specific areas, citing evidence.

  • Discuss their continued use of Zoom, Teams, and email, addressing any remaining questions in the functional training.

  • Discuss what continues to work well and why, while also asking about ongoing areas of success.

  • Discuss areas that still require attention or improvement and ask for ideas to support improvement.

  • Share feedback on specific areas that could be improved, providing evidence and clarifying expectations.

  • Assess relationships with team members and mentors.

  • Address any questions about departmental structure or internal working relationships.

90 Day Check-In Meeting:

  • Ask the new employee about their past 30 days.

  • Provide feedback on their progress in specific areas, citing evidence.

  • Discuss their use of Zoom, Teams, and email, addressing any remaining questions from functional training.

  • Inquire about how to provide the best feedback for them.

  • Discuss areas that may still require attention or improvement and request ideas to support improvement.

  • Share feedback on specific areas that could be improved, providing evidence and clarifying expectations.

  • Assess relationships with team members and mentors.

  • Address any questions about departmental structure or internal working relationships.

6-Month Probationary Review:

This meeting is more formal and follows a different process. It's a necessary meeting to evaluate the employee's job effectiveness. The supervisor completes a Performance Evaluation Form provided by the HR department. The meeting should still include discussions about the employee's progress, reliable areas, feedback, and support for improvement.

One-Year Work Anniversary Meeting:

This meeting is a celebration of the employee's one-year work anniversary. Discussions should include the employee's progress, areas of success, feedback, and support for improvement. Express gratitude for their contribution to the organization.

Where should Check-Ins take place?

Check-Ins can be conducted through various means based on the structure and preference of the organization. Some common options include:

In-person meetings: Face-to-face meetings allow for 1:1 interaction, non-verbal cues, and a more personal connection. They are particularly valuable for initial Check-Ins and building a solid foundation. Video calls: In cases where the new employee is remote or located elsewhere, video conferencing platforms provide an effective means to conduct Check-Ins while still maintaining visual interaction. Phone calls: When face-to-face interaction isn't possible, phone calls provide a convenient alternative for Check-Ins, allowing for direct conversation and real-time feedback. Communication via email or chat: In certain circumstances, Check-Ins may occur through text-based communication channels. While not as personal as face-to-face meetings, these methods can still facilitate convenient feedback and support.

The choice of communication medium should be based on the nature of the discussion, the level of necessity, and the preferences of both the new employee and the manager.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What if the new employee doesn't have any specific questions during the Check-Ins? It's not uncommon for new employees to have periods where they don't have any particular concerns or specific questions. In these cases, the Check-Ins can focus on reviewing their overall progress, acknowledging their achievements, and discussing any upcoming projects or goals. Check-Ins can also be an opportunity to provide updates about the organization, upcoming events, or training opportunities that may be relevant to the new employee.

How long do Check-Ins meetings typically last?

The timing of Check-Ins can vary depending on the complexity of the discussion and the needs of the new employee. On average, Check-In sessions can range from 30 minutes to an hour. However, what's important is prioritizing quality over quantity. It's crucial to focus on meaningful support, addressing concerns, and promoting open communication, rather than rigidly adhering to a specific time limit.

Summary

Check-Ins play a crucial role in providing support, guidance, and feedback to new employees. By scheduling Check-Ins at appropriate intervals, organizations can create a positive onboarding experience; adjust expectations; identify and address challenges; while also facilitating conditions for the growth and development of new employees. Remember that effective Check-Ins require active listening, constructive feedback, goal-setting, and continuous improvement. By doing so, organizations can prepare their new employees for success and nurture a culture of continuous support and development.